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A new Playground in Vietnam
February 15th, 2012
07:39 PM ET

New hope for Vietnam's children of the dump

CNN's Natalie Allen went with an adventure-philanthropy group to explore Vietnam. She ended up building a new playground for the children of the Catalyst Foundation in the coastal town of Rach Gia. Children in this area were previously living and playing around a large trash dump. Families around the border of Cambodia and Vietnam frequently have to worry about the harsh reality that their children could be sold to the sex trafficking industry.  

By Natalie Allen, CNN

Twelve-year-old Dieu wears a bright-green top sprinkled with yellow flowers as she squats in a pile of garbage with her mother.

The two talk and laugh while their hands work quickly, sorting plastic from the discarded food and waste.

A full bag will bring their family just pennies. But this is their life’s work. They live on a dump in Rach Gia, Vietnam, part of the Mekong Delta.

Dieu’s little sister, one of nine siblings, watches from the family’s two-room shack. One of her brothers sits on a nearby tombstone with his dog. The dump lies on an abandoned cemetery, and the above-ground tombs are the only places to sit that aren’t covered by trash.

Some 200 families live on this and one other dump in Rach Gia. They are three generations of Cambodians who fled the brutal Khmer Rouge regime in the 1970s. It’s the only home they have ever known.

What they eat and what they wear is often from what they find in the trash. For the longest time, the children didn't even know flip-flops were supposed to match.

But there is a danger here far worse than filth or poverty.

Human traffickers prey on these poor people’s desperation. Children are bought and sold here, some for as little as $100. The parents sell because they are tricked into believing that the buyer has good intentions, that their children will have a promising job and a promising future. They so badly want to help their sons and daughters escape poverty.

Oftentimes, however, the children end up as sex slaves.

“The trafficker looks like your mom, (the trafficker) doesn't look like a bad guy," said Caroline Nguyen Ticarro-Parker, who founded the Catalyst Foundation to help Dieu and other children in Vietnam's poorest communities.

The kids are sometimes stolen, too, when they make their long walk into town to sell lottery tickets.

“When we started, we knew of a house that was at the entrance of the dump, and we know girls were being taken in there by traffickers and being raped,” Ticarro-Parker said. "If they screamed, then they were let go. If they didn't scream, then they were taken. And the girls were as young as 4."

Lessons for survival

After leaving Dieu’s dump, I arrive at another one just as a sanitation truck leaves behind a fresh pile.

People scurry with picks and bags and start sorting. They work day and night alongside their children. At 1 a.m., when the last truck of the day arrives, they all don headlamps to work in the dark.

I follow a mother who carries her baby to the family’s shack. One could barely call it that; it is nothing more than tarps strung together for shelter. Bowls of discarded food are covered in flies. Clothes dry on barbed wire.

The mother lays her baby in a net strung up as a hammock. After rocking the baby to sleep, she heads back out to work in the dump.

Another parent offers me his baby when I arrive. He is cradling a little boy, months old, wearing a colorful striped hat. The father swats flies away from the child’s face. He mistakenly thinks I am here to buy his baby.

Ticarro-Parker’s family fled Vietnam when she was a child. She returned as an adult to give back to her homeland, bringing clothes to the poor. But when she stumbled onto the families of the Rach Gia dumps, she knew much more had to be done.

She went back home to Minnesota, started raising money and eventually opened a school for the children of the dump.

Lesson one: Arm the children with cell phones so they can call for help.

“It sounds weird, but we gave the prettiest girls the cell phones first,” Ticarro-Parker said. “They’re most at risk.”

Lesson two: Teach the children to read so that if they are taken, they can read city signs and call the school to let them know where they are.

That happened in 2008. Four girls were taken, but the traffickers were caught because the girls had a cell phone and knew how to read a road sign to give their location.

Lesson three: Teach the children to run if strangers approach.

That’s exactly what 13-year-old Hanh did when men, presumably traffickers, chased her and her brother as they walked home on the last day of school in 2010. She did what she was taught and ran. But while getting away, Hanh fell into a canal and drowned.

Ticarro-Parker fights back tears recalling the tragedy: “She died doing what we asked.”

Before she died, Hanh was interviewed for the school’s first brochure. Next to her picture is a quote of what hope meant to her: “Hope is my school.”

School is the only hope for these children, Ticarro-Parker says. It strengthens the entire community.

"When we started it was 99% illiteracy,” she said. “None of the parents (at the dumps) knew how to read and write, the children had never been to school.”

They are now down to 40% illiteracy.

“The children are understanding that they could be the generation that doesn't work in the dump,” Ticarro-Parker said.

The school also teaches parents the cold hard truth: what will really happen to their children if they sell them.

In 2006, before the school opened, more than 37 girls from the dumps were sold to traffickers by their parents, Ticarro-Parker said. In 2011, only four were sold.

'A catalyst for change'

Inside one of the school’s two classrooms, a boy writes in his notebook. He clutches a blue pen with fingers covered in dirt, black under all his fingernails. The children are dirty, but their maroon-and-white school uniforms are crisp. Across their backs reads, “be a catalyst for change.” And they all wear shoes that match.

Outside is the sound of a power saw. Volunteers are here to build a playground for the school, which was built on a rice paddy on the edge of the town.

It will be the first real playground these children have seen.

One Vietnamese woman helps the volunteers with sanding and toting wood. She is working to pay off a debt to the school. She sold her teenage daughter to traffickers – twice – and the school helped get her back both times. Now the woman works to pay off her debt.

When the playground opens, the children are waiting. They swarm. Up the climbing wall, down the slide, over the monkey bars, onto the swings. They have to be taught how to pump their legs and pull the ropes to make the swings move. They don’t have any idea how it works. They learn quickly, however, and are soon flying high.

Dieu, on the seesaw, screams with joy as a row of girls fall like dominoes onto the sand in hysterical laughter. Seeing their smiles and hearing their joy, it is hard to believe these children live on a garbage dump.

"Over the last year and a half, the boys and girls have been happy,” Ticarro-Parker said. “They want to be singers and teachers and doctors and architects. Suddenly they have a career in mind. …

“We're not going to eliminate trafficking. We are not going to change this whole culture of girls feeling unworthy of themselves. But we're going to change this group of girls. We're going to change 200 girls. It's going to happen, one girl at a time."


Filed under: asia • backstory • CNN Freedom Project • journalists • photography • Uncategorized
soundoff (14 Responses)
  1. Iza

    Yucky is a good word for it, Grace! Stand sonrtg, call on your faith, and remember you are loving your kids each time you say no to the yucky stuff, in particular as the peer pressure builds.

    February 24, 2012 at 9:49 am | Report abuse |
  2. Jennifer Smith

    The information in this article is not accurate. Did you have your own outside Khmer speaking translator and the families told you they fled from the Khmer Rouge or did you only speak with the people who work for the organization?

    March 5, 2012 at 9:59 am | Report abuse |
  3. Jason-M Nguyen

    Thank you!!! Natalie Allen for your visit to my old hometown Rach Gia, Vietnam. Thank you for giving those unfortunate poor people a playground that they can express their freedom. I have seen those people that have live on top of a trash field, it is very disturbing. One of the things that got me frustrated the most was the parents of the kids live on the trash field, they do not allow their kids to go school. I know there are barriers to access for these people, but I know that there are cheap education that the Vietnamese-American trying to sponsor to help them. I really appreciate your charity works in Rach Gia, I hope you can continue to doing so.

    March 7, 2012 at 4:31 am | Report abuse |
    • Joe

      Neat blog! Is your theme custom made or did you dowolnad it from somewhere? A design like yours with a few simple tweeks would really make my blog stand out. Please let me know where you got your design. Thanks

      March 24, 2012 at 3:46 pm | Report abuse |
      • Lautaro

        Whew just read through your recap of the last few days tnakhs so much for posting your experiences and your heart. Your recounts have sparked a lot of memories & emotions in me that I wish hadn't faded so quickly in brutal American sun.LIA has a very strong future, and I'm VERY excited to see your team's resulting material from this trip. Welcome back home, and I'll be thinking about you as you take on life-after-Africa. For me, it has been completely different and not different enough all at the same time.-Adam

        October 1, 2012 at 10:59 am | Report abuse |
  4. Marylourdes

    what the hell is a turtle dick and what the hell does that have to do with whhteer or not that photo was funny? you get over yourself! perpetuating hateful images and comments about Indigenous people is something only an ignorant ass would participate in doing. ick.

    May 9, 2012 at 3:17 am | Report abuse |
    • Sam

      I love the read .my daughter is ameazd other kids don't eat fruits and veggies like we do my kids love to visit the farmers market and pick up fresh things right off the farmers trucks. Our favorite thing to say to the corn Man . I would like all the corn with worms .(gets everyone's attention) If the worms don't like it I won't either and if it doesn't have worms you have used too many chemicals on it . the farmer gives me my corn for free and the ones that over heard me ask for wormy corn ..lovein life in NC miss you Isabel jen

      October 3, 2012 at 5:59 am | Report abuse |
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    December 3, 2012 at 11:34 am | Report abuse |
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    February 25, 2013 at 7:26 am | Report abuse |